Another Roundtable Chat with the Cast of “Archer”

This last summer, while the world held it’s breath about the American election, fans of “Archer” got a bit of satisfaction as the show was renewed for another three seasons. And so it was that, for the second year in a row, I met with almost all of the regulars of the humorously brutal animated spy/private eye sitcom, as well as the show’s creator, Adam Reed, who also provides the voice of fun-loving voice of sanity Ray Gillette. Like my last “Archer” chat held at San Diego Comic-Con, the interviews were done two at a time in super-fast five-minute stints. Alas, this meant that acting legend Jessica Walter deferred almost entirely to Reed. Similarly, ace farceur Chris Parnell lent brilliant but “you had to be there” comic support to Lucky Yates’s thoughts on voicing the lovably sinister Dr. Algernon Krieger. Happily, stars H. Jon Benjamin, Aisha Tyler, Judy Greer and Amber Nash were more easily transcribed.

As for the new season, with selfish superspy turned self-involved private eye Sterling Archer last seen floating fully clothed and wrong side down in a Hollywood pool, “Dreamland” will take us into a season-long fantasia set in the film noir heyday of 1947. Presumably emanating from the not-quite-dead Archer’s brain and very definitely from the show’s new network home of FXX, the show premieres Wednesday, April 5th at 10PM.

We are promised a great many noir references, the return of former guest star Jeffrey Tambor and no doubt phrasing and anachronistic references to Kenny Loggins. We can also reportedly expect a touching tribute to the long-suffering character of Woodhouse, formerly played by veteran actor George Coe, who passed away at 86 in July 2015, a few days after my first meeting with the “Archer” cast.

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Why do people hate Autotrader NASCAR driver Brad Keselowski?

Why Does Everyone Hate Brad Keselowski?

Every time Team Penske driver Brad Keselowski wins a race, you can feel people (and hear them, depending on where you’re standing at the track) groan.

But why?

Sure, I’m the guy wearing the #2 hat in the above picture, cheering my ass off in Victory Lane with a forward-facing Miller Lite in my hand after Brad’s come-from-behind win in Atlanta, so I’m not as partial as some.

But perhaps I’m even more judgmental considering I’ve hitched my fanboy man-wagon to the BK express since becoming a NASCAR fan three years ago.

It was refreshing and fun to interact with BK and confirm that the reasons I liked him as a driver were the same reasons I liked him upon meeting him. So why does everyone hate Brad Keselowski?

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Charles “Peanut” Tillman talks being a #ShellOut for National Peanut Board, Bears struggles

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During a 13-year NFL playing career that saw him participate in two Super Bowls and set Chicago Bears franchise records for career interceptions (36) and defensive TDs (9), Charles “Peanut” Tillman was a hard nut to crack on defense.

Starting in his rookie season with a game-winning INT in the endzone against then-Superfreak Randy Moss, Tillman left opposing wide receivers salty.

Tillman earned the nickname “Peanut” from his aunt because as a baby she claimed his body resembled the shape of a peanut. And 36 years after his birth, the National Peanut Board couldn’t be more thrilled, naming him the spokesman for its new Shell Out campaign.

“Does promoting peanuts make me a sell-out? No, but it does make me a shell out,” quips Tillman in the above video. “We want to know exactly how much people love peanuts by sharing how big of a Shell Out they are on social media.”

While we’re nuts for peanuts, we asked Peanut what he thinks about the Bears’ moves in free agency, if the organization can succeed while the McCaskeys are still in charge, and about playing in the Super Bowl. Listen to the full interview:

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Super Bowl LI: From Pizza Hut to the NFL, DeAngelo Williams always delivers

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This Sunday during the Super Bowl, Pizza Hut will produce over two million pizzas that will be consumed by football fans as they watch the game. Among the fans will be Pittsburgh Steelers running back DeAngelo Williams.

In 2000, the then 16-year-old Williams worked at Pizza Hut as a cashier, cook and delivery driver. “I grew up in the small town of Wynne, Arkansas, which had about 8,000 people,” Williams said. “You knew the people who were good tippers and definitely got those people their pizzas first.”

For Pizza Hut, the largest pizza restaurant in the world, the day of the Big Game is also the largest delivery day of the year. To prepare, Pizza Hut hired an additional 11,000 employees.

Last week in Pittsburgh, I hung out with Williams and watched him put delivery drivers through various drills at the Pizza Hut Delivery Combine. “Coach Williams'” whistle never seemed to get a rest.

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A roundtable chat with the cast and crew of Amazon’s “The Man in the High Castle”

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A couple of strange things happened last summer. You might remember them. First, the people of the United Kingdom decided to leave the European Union. Then, the Republican Party’s base chose to nominate a reality TV star and alleged billionaire for the presidency of the United States. When this writer found himself in a San Diego Hilton ballroom for Comic-Con roundtables with an executive producer and five cast members of “The Man in the High Castle,” Brexit was a certainty and the dystopian Republican convention had just wrapped. Even so, the election of vulgar reality TV star turned racist demagogue Donald J. Trump to the world’s most powerful political position seemed scary, but kind of unlikely. Yup.

In any case, these two events made for some interesting conversation, considering that “The Man in the High Castle” is the deliberately paced, lavishly produced Amazon TV series drawn from Phillip K. Dick’s dark, reality-bending 1963 science fiction masterpiece. Set in an alternate reality 1962 America some years after the totalitarian Axis powers of Germany and Japan have won World War II and subdivided the nation into a Nazi-dominated East Coast, a Japan-controlled West Coast, and a no-man’s land in the middle, the show portrays the lives of a number of characters caught up in a series of tragic and terrifying events. They are largely spurred by the existence of strange films that seem to show a world where the Allied powers of the U.S. and the UK had actually won World War II. By the end of the first season, it had become clear that other parallel realities would factor into the story’s next phase.

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