Terrell Owens on Hall of Fame, HGH use, being #BolderThanBold

2016 NFL Hall of Fame nominee and pro football legend Terrell Owens has teamed up with Butterfinger to make the Super Bowl bolder than ever before with the Bolder Than Bold campaign by asking players to bring back the boldest moves on the field – the touchdown dances. Butterfinger has offered to cover up to $50,000 for fines that may be incurred by any player boldly celebrating in the endzone.

In the video above, we asked T.O. about his potential Hall of Fame induction, if he ever used HGH or PEDs, and his favorite endzone celebration. Below are a few highlights:

Favorite touchdown celebration:

“My favorite was either the popcorn or the pom poms. I think those were two that were really kind of spur of the moment and impromptu. Sometimes, when you get in the moment, you have the best celebrations.”

Who gets into the Hall of Fame between him and contemporary Randy Moss:

“I’m definitely going to go with myself. I did it across the board, I did a little bit of everything. I did the little things, I did the intangibles. I blocked downfield, I played hard for four quarters, and with some people’s assessment of his play, he didn’t play 100% of the time.”

On Peyton Manning’s HGH/PED usage and if he ever used:

“No, man. What you see is a product of pure hard work, dedication in the weight room. I think (the speculation on Manning) is as ridiculous as Mike Martz’s comments about me leapfrogging his two guys (Torry Holt, Isaac Bruce) to get into the Hall of Fame. To look at Peyton Manning and think he’s on HGH? Really? He might be on some Butterfingers, but he ain’t on HGH!”

For more information on Butterfinger’s #BolderThanBold campaign, check out the YouTube Channel.

  

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Drink of the Week: The Stinger

The Stinger.During my pre-cocktailian days, I’d often get tired of my usual scewdrivers, Bloody Marys, and dirty martinis and ask the barkeep if he or she could think of anything good. The answer was, nearly always, a blank stare. The fact that not a single one ever suggested a Stinger to me is something of a minor crime.

Here is a drink that is about as easy to make as any decent cocktail I’ve ever had and not lacking in some sweet mass appeal. It’s also got some sophistication to it, but it can be delightfully good with the cheap stuff. It is definitely one of the great  mass appeal drinks perfect for the truly lazy or over-stressed bartender, which means you can try ordering this at your local dive or TGIF-type bar and it might even taste good.

The Stinger

2 1/4 ounces brandy
3/4 ounce white creme de menthe

Combine in a cocktail shaker with plenty of ice. Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass and consider what you’ll do with the all the time you’ve saved on this drink.

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Unless you make your own, it seems like there’s not a whole lot of alternatives when it comes to creme de menthe, and the seriously inexpensive DeKuyper product I was using is pretty much the standard. So, with this drink it’s the choice of brandy that can make a big difference, though I have to say I never had a bad Stinger.

Even so, the best brandy seems to yield the best results. So, my best Stinger was made with a reasonably priced bottle of Maison Rouge Cognac. A surprisingly close second was a downright cheap bottle of Pierre Duchene Napolean Brandy from Trader Joe’s, which is actually cheaper than my usual TJ default, Reynal, and most would say less good. I still thought it worked very nicely. A not at all poor third place was E&J VSOP, which I would never consider drinking on its own, but was still fine in a Stinger.

I also had a very nice Stinger (pictured above) when I found myself near my Orange County digs at the pricey but lovable Antonello’s in Santa Ana. I went all Ian Fleming on our waiter, demanding a drink that was 2 parts brandy and a half part creme de menthe. I have no idea whether or not Antonello’s followed my instructions, or what brands they used, but it definitely came out as as a sweetly sophisticated treat, all sweet and winey but with a backbone.

Before I go, I have to add that today’s recipe is pretty much a direct steal from David Wondrich but, in any case, the Stinger is a drink that allows for adjustment to personal taste. For starters, if you find measuring out 2 1/4 ounces too precise and annoying, feel free to just go with 2 ounces of brandy and 1/2 ounce creme de menthe and, if that doesn’t float your boat, feel free to mess around with the proportions. I will say, however, that you should be reasonably sparing of the creme de menthe, whatever you do.

Also, if you’ve only got the green kind of creme de menthe, it’s probably okay to use that. Robert Hess, however, says you should only do that to a Stinger during the holidays. What’s the next holiday?

  

Bullz-Eye talks “Smellmitment” with Old Spice Guys Terry Crews and Isaiah Mustafa

Old Spice Guys Terry Crews, left, and Isaiah Mustafa, team up for the first time ever to celebrate their popular “Make a Smellmitment” campaign to teach guys that whatever their scent choice, Old Spice has them covered, and announce next Tuesday’s much-anticipated conclusion to the campaign, on Wednesday, November 18, 2015, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision for Old Spice/AP Images)

This week, for the first time ever, Old Spice ​Guy​s ​Terry Crews​ and Isaiah Mustafa joined forces at the Redbury Hotel in Hollywood to celebrate their popular “Make A Smellmitment” campaign and the upcoming grand finale commercial, which debuts on Tuesday, Nov. 24 at 6 p.m. ET on ESPN “SportsCenter.”

We spoke to Terry and Isaiah about getting over fears of smellmitment, picking up hot babes and their journey to Old Spice pitchmen.

Bullz-Eye: Terry and Isaiah, I feel like I am in an Old Spice sandwich!

Isaiah Mustafa: Is that good or bad?

BE: We’ll see! So far, so good though. Are you guys sitting there with your shirts off right now? Because every time I see you on TV, you are both shirtless.

Isaiah: No, not this time.

Terry Crews: I am completely shirtless underneath my clothes right now!

BE: Guys, I have a confession for you – I’ve always been a little bit afraid of ‘Smellmitment.’ I can barely even say the word. Why should I re-evaluate my stance courtesy of Old Spice at this point in my life? I’ve been burned in the past.

Isaiah: Listen, you don’t want to do the same thing forever – you want to change it up every now and then. Right now, you have three different scents to choose from. It’s actually more than that, but right now we’re pushing these three. You know what you need to do? Go buy each one and switch it up. One week you do Bearglove, one week you do Timber, and the next week try Swagger and see what happens.

Terry: You have to examine the repercussions when you change it up. If good things happen, you made the right move.

Isaiah: You’re only as good as your last mistake, know what I mean? Make a smellmitment, man!

BE: I need some insight on how to score with hot babes. I know Old Spice is a key ingredient in that mixture, but from the vantage point of a couple of studs like you guys, what’s the number one thing I have to do?

Isaiah: Tell the truth.

Terry: I like to take a different approach. A lot of times, those other guys will tell you their scent will get you a bunch of girls and I ain’t gonna lie to you – if you’re not a good man, and you’re not a good person, you’re not gonna get anybody.

What you need to do is work on yourself. To be the best “you” that you can be. There is only one you. And that will attract the right woman to you. It’s not about tricking women into sleeping with me or being with me and all this stuff. It’s about being a good man, respecting women, respecting the people that are around you and treating everyone with respect. That’s the Old Spice way. That’s the difference that we do. And that comes through in the advertising. It’s an amazing company to work with.

BE: What was the journey for each of you guys to end up working for Old Spice?

Isaiah: For me, I just went to an audition. I got an email, went to the audition, and then sat back and hoped I got the job. And when it happened, I was just hoping the commercial would run a full cycle of 22 weeks. And six years later, here I am!

Terry: I remember watching “The Man Your Man Could Smell Like” and I thought it was the best commercial ever made. That’s not even hyperbole, that’s the truth. Then, I was in the middle of something and got a call about doing an Old Spice commercial. And I was like, ‘YES, those are great, I saw that!’ And they said, they were looking for a ‘Terry Crews type.’ Because they were scared to ask me, because it was so weird.

  

A roundtable chat with the drunk historians of “Drunk History”

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It’s hard not to kind of love the very simplicity of the concept behind Comedy Central’s “Drunk History.” Every episode features three absolutely true episodes from U.S. history as recounted by a really and truly very drunk person, and then reenacted by a cast of often famed and always 100% sober actors who are nevertheless mouthing dialogue direct from the drunken booze-addled narrator’s mouth. Yes, it’s a one-joke premise, but it’s a very good joke and somewhat educational besides.

As both a tried and true geek and Bullz-Eye’s official cocktail guy, it made total sense for me to meet with some of the creators and cast of “Drunk History” at Comic-Con last July. Each episode of the show, which returns to Comedy Central September 1st, is based in a different U.S. city, featuring important political, social and pop cultural stories from that particular city’s storied past. This year’s list includes Miami and two of this writer’s favorite drunk places, Las Vegas and New Orleans.

I was fortunate to meet with the show’s creators who first launched the series as a set of “Funny or Die” web videos. That would be actor and comic Derrick Waters – who appears in segments as a sort of drinking chaperone for the featured drunk historian, as well as in all of the reenactments – and producer Jeremy Konnor. Also along for the ride were performers Taran Killam of “SNL” fame, and the voluble actress Paget Brewster (“Community,” “Criminal Minds”), who holds the rare honor of being both a reenactor and a drunk historian. She and her cohorts had plenty to say on the topic of mixing history with booze.

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A day in the life of NASCAR driver Cole Whitt

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The best things in NASCAR thrive under pressure. Whether it’s the engine, pit crew or driver, it’s a game of constant pressure, a game of endurance that lasts from February to November. And the team that handles it the best wins the Sprint Cup.

“Typically, you’ve got several things to do,” said 24-year old Speed Stick driver Cole Whitt about his routine for each race weekend. “Each day, you wake up around nine, go to the track and take care of all of your pre-race track duties.”

The demands placed on a NASCAR driver throughout the season are intense. The idea that drivers get to the track, turn left for three hours and then resume their day-to-day life is false.

“After a race, you recover the rest of Sunday. You only get three days at home a week. Then you rest on Monday and try to tax your body with workouts Tuesday and Wednesday, travel again on Thursday – we’re constantly travelling or moving.”

But time at the track, both pre-race and during the race, are only two components of a busy schedule.

“You usually have media obligations both days, whether its interviews or appearances, and then the race. From the minute the checkered flag finishes, you’re essentially preparing for the next Sunday from that moment on.”

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This weekend, one of those appearances was for Speed Stick, signing autographs and giving away #35 T-shirts at a local Kroger grocery store, where the temperature reached the mid-90s. “I typically lose between 10-12 pounds per race. Sitting in a car is like being in a sauna for four hours.”

A test of mental endurance as much as physical, doubt can also creep into the mind of a driver during the grueling season.

“It’s really easy to get down on yourself, to doubt yourself, especially as a smaller team,” said Whitt about his crew, which is roughly half the size of the larger teams they’re competing against.

“It’s a different mentality here. If we’re Top 25, we are proud of our team. The team has to work as hard with half as much of the support as the big teams. But the biggest thing is staying mentally healthy and not feeling doubt.”

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