Terrell Owens on Hall of Fame, HGH use, being #BolderThanBold

2016 NFL Hall of Fame nominee and pro football legend Terrell Owens has teamed up with Butterfinger to make the Super Bowl bolder than ever before with the Bolder Than Bold campaign by asking players to bring back the boldest moves on the field – the touchdown dances. Butterfinger has offered to cover up to $50,000 for fines that may be incurred by any player boldly celebrating in the endzone.

In the video above, we asked T.O. about his potential Hall of Fame induction, if he ever used HGH or PEDs, and his favorite endzone celebration. Below are a few highlights:

Favorite touchdown celebration:

“My favorite was either the popcorn or the pom poms. I think those were two that were really kind of spur of the moment and impromptu. Sometimes, when you get in the moment, you have the best celebrations.”

Who gets into the Hall of Fame between him and contemporary Randy Moss:

“I’m definitely going to go with myself. I did it across the board, I did a little bit of everything. I did the little things, I did the intangibles. I blocked downfield, I played hard for four quarters, and with some people’s assessment of his play, he didn’t play 100% of the time.”

On Peyton Manning’s HGH/PED usage and if he ever used:

“No, man. What you see is a product of pure hard work, dedication in the weight room. I think (the speculation on Manning) is as ridiculous as Mike Martz’s comments about me leapfrogging his two guys (Torry Holt, Isaac Bruce) to get into the Hall of Fame. To look at Peyton Manning and think he’s on HGH? Really? He might be on some Butterfingers, but he ain’t on HGH!”

For more information on Butterfinger’s #BolderThanBold campaign, check out the YouTube Channel.

  

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The Stories Behind Some of Your Favorite Online Images

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It’s hard to imagine a time when an image became popular without the Internet. How was that even possible? What took years of circulating in newspapers and on television now takes minutes as photos are swiftly posted and reposted throughout cyberspace. In fact, it’s been said that more pictures are taken every two minutes around the world in modern times than were taken during the entire 19th century.

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Drink of the Week: The Japalac

The Japalac.If the first thing you think of when you see the name “the Japalac” is an unfortunate racial slur that is now fortunately mostly relegated to old movies about World War II, you can be forgiven. Cocktail historian Ted Haigh unearthed the drink earlier this century and calls its name a “gut-level red herring” because it was actually named for a type of varnish produced by the Glidden company. Jap-A-Lac was named for Japan drier, a product still in use that Wikipedia tell us that borrows its name from the term “japanning,”  “the use of drying oils as an imitation or substitution for urushiol based Japanese lacquer.”

While these kind of terms make us think of the sort of cultural appropriation that followed back in the day when non-European countries suddenly emerged into the Western cultural context to be pop-culturalized in all sorts of fascinating and problematic ways, there’s no getting around the fact that the Japalac carries some odd associations. Still, I think we can find a way to enjoy without offending either people of Japanese ancestry or, for that matter, myself, since — at least in the broadest possible outlines — I was once arguably a Jewish-American Prince.

Well, that’s enough backstory, let’s get to the drink which really ain’t bad at all, though your choice of ingredients can make a more enormous difference than usual.

The Japalac

3/4 ounce rye whiskey
3/4 dry vermouth
1/2 ounce fresh orange juice
1 teaspoon raspberry syrup
1 orange twist (garnish)

Combine the whiskey, vermouth, juice and syrup in a cocktail shaker. Shake vigorously and strain into chilled, relatively small, cocktail glass — this is a drink of the sensibly modest size that was once the standard. Add the orange twist and sip relatively slowly and quietly. Remember not to  say “Japalac” too loudly in a public place, lest you be misunderstood.

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First of all, I was forced to depart from Ted Haigh’s recipe…in a sense. For starters, it calls for “juice of 1/4 orange.” I have a bone to pick with such non-specific instructions since oranges come in all sizes and levels of juiciness, so I settled on 1/2 an ounce…which turns out to have required about a fourth of the particular oranges I was using, so I guess Haigh’s not completely insane.

The possibly bigger departure was that I used Torani raspberry syrup, which is typically used for coffee-house style Italian sodas as well as cocktails, and it worked out just fine. However, I would be remiss if I didn’t at least mention that, as I learned last year, Mr. Haigh typically prefers the sort of raspberry syrup that was traditionally used as a substitute for grenadine, and which is made by companies like Smuckers and more closely resembles jam without any fruit. Alas, four visits to area markets reveals that there appears to be some kind of Smucker’s Raspberry Syrup drought out here in the San Fernando Valley area, though boysenberry and strawberries flavors are easy to come by, if that’s your thing.

In any case, while I tried the Japalac with four different types of rye — Rittenhouse, Bulleit, Alberta Dark Rye, and George Dickel — the really big difference was apparently made by the orange. Indeed, my first attempt was pretty much ruined by my choice of a grapefruit-esque cara cara orange. Later attempts with some very sweet navel oranges changed the tenor of the drink completely, making it more of a sweet and fruity treat. I think I liked the Alberta Dark Rye/navel juice version the best, though George Dickel Rye, and a slightly less sweet navel orange was almost perfectly balanced.

Finally, let’s get back to the name. While it’s true there was no anti-Japanese malice that we know of in the naming of today’s DOTW, the term “Japan drier” from whence the Jap-a-Lac varnish got it’s name, clearly harks back to late 19th century, when the West and East Asia were engaged in the beginning of a long love-hate relationship. The result of the early honeymoon period was at least two operas, Puccini’s tragic “Madama Butterfly” and Gilbert & Sullivan’s comic “The Mikado.” I’m more of a comedy guy, so let’s drink to the topsy turvy folks who gave us that one.

  

The Future of Online Gambling – Mobile & Live Dealer

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Since the creation of the first online casinos in the mid-1990s, their products have come a long way to finally attain the level where they currently spoil online gambling aficionados via extremely high quality content that comprehensively caters to their gambling entertainment hobbies. Modern players, witting and unwittingly gain huge benefit from the availability of a far larger variety in content options that they can integrate with from just about anywhere they may find network coverage, immaterial of the type of player platform they may prefer i.e. desktop or mobile.

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Get the Right Adventure Shoes for Your Gal

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There are so many beautiful parts of the world to see. The most gorgeous places, however, are the ones untouched by man. These places usually require a little more than a hop, skip, and a jump. Hiking, trudging, and lots, and lots of walking seem the more appropriate terms to use. You can totally understand how all this physical activity is worth it. It is, after all, a small price to pay to see nature in its purest form.

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