Techgating with AT&T

AT&T Fan Zone Tour Truck

Football season is underway and with early fall weather it’s a perfect time to enjoy tailgating before watching your favorite team.

With new technologies, the whole tailgating experience can be enhanced in many ways. AT&T refers to this as “techgating.” Techgating is the intersection of technology and tailgating regardless of whether you’re at home, on the go or at the game. Use the latest apps, handy-dandy gadgets and lighting fast connections to enhance your tailgate experience and stay up-to-date on all things College Football.

This year, AT&T is giving College Football fans the ultimate #Techgating experience by highlighting innovative ways AT&T technology is helping connect fans all over the nation through their AT&T Fan Zone Tour! Fans will be able to visit the AT&T Fan Zone Tour trucks during AT&T sponsored games and participate in a Fight Song Mashup, Social T-Shirt Cannon, Social Heat Map, use Solar Charging Stations and watch games via U-Verse Live Stream projections.

Throughout the College Football season, AT&T is encouraging fans to share their best #Techgating tips for a chance to win a trip to the 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship! Go here [http://techgating.att.com] for more information to share how good you are at techgating. You can tweet your pic, video or tip with #techgating for a chance to win a trip to the 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship!

#Techgating post brought to you by AT&T

  

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The Millennial Challenge: Homeownership

big house in suberbs

It has been said that “the ache for home lives in all of us, the safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned.”

Where in the name of Jay Electronica does that leave the Millennials among us? You know; the overly analyzed champions of legalized marijuana, delayed marriage, and social liberalism. 18-34 year olds make up a scrum of perpetual renters and childhood home dwellers that probably couldn’t qualify for a traditional home loan if it fell out of Ariana Grande’s auto tune machine and landed directly in their collective laps. It’s hard to blame Generation Y; after all, we grew up during the dotcom 90’s and then graduated into the worst recession the country had experienced since the 1930s. A childhood defined by economic prosperity leading to a bourgeoning adulthood where a net worth of $10,400 makes you wealthier than half of your fresh faced 18-34 year old peers; that’s irony only a Generation Xer could appreciate.

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Blu Tuesday: Transformers, Chef and Third Person

Every Tuesday, I review the newest Blu-ray releases and let you know whether they’re worth buying, renting or skipping, along with a breakdown of the included extras. If you see something you like, click on the cover art to purchase the Blu-ray from Amazon, and be sure to share each week’s column on Facebook and Twitter with your friends.

“Transformers: Age of Extinction”

WHAT: Following the Battle of Chicago, a CIA black ops team led by the ruthless Harold Attinger (Kelsey Grammer) has begun hunting down the surviving Autobots and Deceptions in order to destroy them. When wannabe inventor Cade Yeager (Mark Wahlberg) discovers Optimus Prime hiding as a beat-up semi-truck, the Autobot leader must protect the Yeager family from Attinger and a mercenary Transformer called Lockdown.

WHY: The most important thing you need to know about “Transformers: Age of Extinction” is that it clocks in at a ridiculously bloated 164 minutes. That’s not a typo, and worse yet, the first half is all just setup to the overly complex plot. Why Michael Bay thought that audiences wanted another “Transformers” film, let alone one that’s nearly three hours long, is anyone’s guess, because “Age of Extinction” is every bit as terrible as the last two installments. The bad dialogue and shameless product placement are to be expected, and the dynamic between the three lead human characters is pretty annoying, but Bay can’t even get the action right in this one, settling for unintelligible set pieces that evade logic almost as much as the story. At this point in the franchise, you’d think that Bay would have a better understanding of what works versus what doesn’t, but he makes many of the same mistakes, including a few new ones. Even the visual effects look less polished than past installments, and if you’re going to surround your action with dull human drama, the least Bay could have done is make it look good.

EXTRAS: The Blu-ray release includes a ton of bonus material for “Transformers” fans to dive into, beginning with the two-hour documentary “Evolution Within Extinction. There’s also a featurette where director Michael Bay discusses some key shots from the film, a behind-the-scenes look at production and a trip to Hasbro headquarters.

FINAL VERDICT: SKIP

“Chef”

WHAT: After quitting his comfy restaurant job due to creative differences with the owner, Chef Carl Casper (Jon Favreau) does the unthinkable by starting up a food truck to revive his passion for the craft. While driving the truck cross-country from Miami to Los Angeles, Carl attempt to mend his relationship with his estranged son (Emjay Anthony), who accompanies him on the trip.

WHY: After the critical and commercial failure of “Cowboys & Aliens,” it’s nice to see Jon Favreau getting back to his roots with a small character-driven piece like “Chef.” Of course, that hasn’t stopped him from filling the movie with lots of great actors, including Scarlett Johansson, Robert Downey Jr. and Dustin Hoffman in cameo roles. The crux of the film, however, falls on Favreau and Emjay Anthony, who work really well together as the father-son duo, while John Leguizamo rounds out the food truck team (as Carl’s dutiful line cook) with his best part in a long time. The feel-good nature of the story means that it’s a fairly predictable journey for Carl, but Favreau takes a timely approach to the material with the whole food truck angle and the incorporation of social media. Though far from the big-budget extravaganza of the first two “Iron Man” films, what the indie comedy lacks in spectacle it makes up for with a great cast, a warm and funny script, and some mouth-watering food porn. Seriously, don’t watch this movie on an empty stomach. You’ve been warned.

EXTRAS: There’s an audio commentary with writer/director Jon Favreau and co-producer Roy Choi, as well as some deleted scenes and outtakes.

FINAL VERDICT: RENT

“Third Person”

WHAT: Three connecting stories that take place in three different cities. In Paris, an esteemed author (Liam Neeson) begins an affair with a fellow writer (Olivia Wilde); in New York, a mother (Mila Kunis) struggles to regain visitation rights of her child; and in Italy, a businessman (Adrian Brody) helps an immigrant woman (Moran Atias) rescue her daughter from a human trafficker.

WHY: It’s incredible how much can change over the course of just a few years, and no one knows that better than Paul Haggis, who went from being one of the most sought-after writer/directors in Hollywood to a filmmaker who hasn’t done anything noteworthy in almost a decade. In fact, it appears that Haggis is still living off the 10-year-old fumes of “Crash,” because his latest multi-story drama also hinges on a narrative device, although to lesser effect. Discussing the silly gimmick in any detail would risk major spoilers, but let’s just say that watching different variations of the same bad story is even worse than sitting through it once. “Third Person” is without a doubt one of the most joyless moviegoing experiences of the year – a convoluted mess filled with insufferable characters and dull stories where nothing really happens. Don’t let the star-studded cast fool you, either, because while Liam Neeson delivers solid work as usual, the rest of the actors are either really poor or look bored out of their minds. Maybe they were promised the chance to be a part of the next “Crash,” but sadly, “Third Person” doesn’t even come close to replicating the excellence of the Oscar winner.

EXTRAS: In addition to an audio commentary by writer/director Paul Haggis (along with several of his cast and crew), there’s a short making-of featurette and a 32-minute Q&A with Haggis moderated by film critic Pete Hammond.

FINAL VERDICT: SKIP

  

A trio of 2012 California reds gets it done for under $20

It occurs to me that $20 might be the ultimate sweet spot in the wine world. There are all sorts of benchmarks and barometers, but for most people taking a leap over the $20 barrier is done cautiously and with consideration. So when I find wines under that threshold that provide significant value and taste way more expensive than the price the cash register will ring up, I make a note of it. Here are three wines made from fruit sourced in various parts of California that offers tons of drinking pleasure and tremendous bang for the buck. One of them even has the necessary elements to lay down for a couple of years, should you so choose. That’s not something often in play in this price range. Whether you’re looking for a wine to bring to a dinner party or something to keep you warm all winter long, these selections will get it done for a minimal price.

california_red_1

Layer Cake 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon – The fruit for this wine was sourced in two distinct appellations, Paso Robles and Alexander Valley. It’s composed entirely of Cabernet Sauvignon. Layer Cake was aged in entirely French oak for 46 months; 30 percent of the barrels utilized were new. This offering has a suggested retail price of $15.99. Plum, black raspberry, vanilla and toast aromas are all part of the tempting nose on this Cabernet. The palate is rich, lush and deeply concentrated with lots of appealing black fruit flavors. Leather, black pepper and earth are all part of the long finish. Soft tannins and solid acidity lend themselves to the food friendliness of this Cabernet. You could probably find a wine slightly more perfectly suited, as well as more expensively priced, to pair with a burger, but why go through the trouble and expense when this one works as well as almost anything?

Educated Guess 2012 Napa Valley Merlot – The vast majority of the fruit for this wine (95 percent) was sourced in Napa Valley, the balance (5 percent) in nearby Lake County. In addition to Merlot (85 percent), some Cabernet Sauvignon (15 percent) was blended in as well. Barrel aging took place in French oak over 12 months. The suggested retail price is $19.99. The color of this wine is striking, the minute it’s poured — the deep purple hue looks brilliant in the glass. A hint of cocoa underscores blueberry aromas on the warm and welcoming nose. The palate is studded with red and black cherry flavors galore that are complemented by black pepper and cinnamon spice. A dollop of chocolate, earth and thyme emerge on the above average finish, along with all the fresh fruit flavors. This is a textbook example of a Merlot that actually tastes like Merlot.

california_red_2

The Sum 2012 Red Blend – Fruit for this offering was sourced throughout California. This selection blends together Cabernet Sauvignon (75 percent), Petite Sirah (15 percent) and Syrah (10 percent). The Sum has a suggested retail price of $19.99. The nose of this blend is big and incredibly floral, and the little bit of Syrah really makes its presence felt. The flavors are deep and dark lending to a layered and dense palate. It’s substantial in complexity and depth. Bits of chicory play alongside blueberry and blackberry flavors, which dominate the palate. Sweet, dark chocolate flavors emerge on the persistent and notably long finish, along with rhubarb and sour cherry. This would be a very good wine and a reasonable value if it was priced in the $35 to $40 range. At $20 suggested retail price, less if you shop around, it’s a fabulous and delicious bargain. Scoop it up before it’s gone.

I highly recommend all three of these wines for sipping and pairing with medium-bodied to full-flavored foods. Each of them is also quite drinkable on its own. The Merlot and the Cabernet will be at their best over the next handful of years when their young, fresh fruit flavors are in full bloom. The red blend (The Sum) is delicious now and will drink well over the next decade. Its structure is such that laying it down, for those with the patience to do so, will provide a nice reward. At such an appealing price point it would be a good choice for those who don’t want to spend a ton to experiment on age-worthy wines.

Check out Gabe’s View for more wine reviews, and follow Gabe on Twitter!

  

Picture of the Day: Kimberly Chaves in a thong

Here’s a great shot in the pool in one of the Luxury suites at The Palms in Las Vegas. Kimberly Chaves shows off her amazing Latina booty in a sexy thong.

Kimberly Chaves in a thong

  

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