Drink of the Week: Shock Me

Shock Me.Since the Superbowl is just about upon us, a beer-based recipe seems like a good idea and, guess what, we’re in luck.

You see, with the aid of divine providence (which I’m agnostic about), not to mention Google and Epicurious (which I’m pretty sure exist), I stumbled upon a beverage that was damn near irresistible. Seriously, this drink is so sweetly easygoing and deceptively gentle and refreshing, you WILL want seconds and thirds and you DO want to make sure you’ve got some extra beds handy at your Superbowl party…or at least make sure you’ve got Lyft or Uber good and downloaded for everyone’s ride home.

Developed by bartenders at Virginia’s Virtue Feed & Grain, the only actually shocking thing about Shock Me is that it’s not a staple of every bar in the land. It’s rich and full bodied comfort booze of the highest order.

Shock Me

2 ounces brown ale
1 ounce bourbon whiskey
1 teaspoon Southern Comfort
1 teaspoon maple syrup

Combine the ingredients in a cocktail shaker or mixing glass. I think it’s okay to stir this very vigorously, but I would not shake it since ale is carbonated, after all. Strain into a well-chilled Old Fashioned/rocks glass, the smaller the better. Sip and toast American football, American booze, or anything else American. Also contemplate why it is that movies with word “American” in the title always seem to do better at the box office.

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Cocktails are largely a U.S. invention. Even so, this is a drink with an unusually American cast to it. So, even though Brown ale is an olde English favorite, it makes sense that the original recipe for this calls for Brooklyn Brown Ale over, say, Newcastle. That brew isn’t available in my North Hollywood locality, so I went with Get Up Offa that Brown Ale from L.A.’s own Golden Road Brewery, perhaps the best (only?) good ale I’ve had from a can. It worked beautifully.

For my whiskey, I first went with Evan Williams, which is  becoming the well bourbon at many of your better bars for a reason. It also worked with the slightly snootier Wathen’s Kentucky Bourbon I had on hand as well, though the result arguably had more of an edge. Since Maker’s Mark is mentioned in the original recipe, I’m sure that would work extremely well also.

Shock Me marks the first time DOTW has had anything to do with Southern Comfort. This is a much maligned and very American liqueur that I hadn’t had since college days and which is, admittedly, sweet to the point of absurdity. However, when you stretch it’s mix of honey, vanilla, and whiskey-like flavors out properly, it’s an important member of this particular party.

That also true of the maple syrup, like beer and raw egg another all rare cocktail ingredient I’m a real sucker for. I should add that when I say “maple syrup” I mean the straight stuff, not your mass market commercial pancakes syrups like Log Cabin or Mrs. Butterworth. If they contain any actual maple or maple derivatives at all, they’re keeping it a secret.

  

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Drink of the Week: The Whiskey Smash

The Whiskey SmashThe Whiskey Smash is probably one of the clearest examples of a drink rescued from complete obscurity by the ongoing classic cocktail revival. Although the modern version featured in a growing number of retro-friendly bars differs enough from the recipe written up by cocktail pioneer Jerry Thomas in 1862 to be an entirely different cocktail, the more polished and slightly more elaborate version below is certainly a classic of sorts.

As it stands, the Whiskey Smash is a close relative of the Mojito and the (I swear upcoming) Mint Julep. It’s outstanding for a warm day or in a bar so crowded if feels like a warm day. Certainly if you’re a fan of whiskey, lemon, mint,  and heavy muddling, this is your drink.

The Whiskey Smash

2-3 ounces whiskey (bourbon, rye, Canadian, etc.)
1 quarter lemon, cut into four or more pieces
5 or more mint leaves
2-3 teaspoons superfine sugar
3 dashes of bitters
1/2-3/4 ounce water (optional)
1 mint sprig (semi-optional garnish)
1 maraschino cherry (very optional garnish)

Combine your whiskey, lemon pieces, superfine sugar, mint leaves and, if you like, splash of water in a cocktail shaker. (The water is really only there to approximate the 1/2 to 3/4 ounces of simple syrup most recipes call for instead of sugar, but I found the results about the same whether or not I included it.)

Muddle it all rather intensely, paying special attention to give a good mushing to the lemon pieces — this is a “smash” after all. You can take it a bit easier on the mint if you like. Make sure, however, that your sugar is dissolved in the liquid, which should happen without too much effort if you’re using superfine sugar and not cheating with ordinary table sugar.

Add lots of ice — cracked or crushed ice is probably better — and shake vigorously. Strain into a well chilled old fashioned glass with a few ice cubes in it. Because of all the lemon, mint, and crushed ice you may have to exercise a bit more patience at the straining stage, but your forebearance will shortly be rewarded. If you’d like an extra dash of sweetness and color, add a maraschino cherry along with the semi-obligatory mint-spring.

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I found the results remarkably consistent regardless of which whiskey I used, though I found using Buffalo Trace bourbon resulted in a slightly more mellow and interesting smash than the super-reasonably priced Evan Williams I picked up for a ten spot. 100 proof whiskeys seem to work well here, and I had good luck using my standby Rittenhouse Rye as well as the hard to find 100 proof Canadian Club I’m lucky enough to have. (You can buy it online here.) I also found that this one drink that worked very nicely not only with traditional aromatic bitters like Angostura, but also with the bottle of Fee Brothers Celery Bitters I recently picked up. (Speaking of revived classics, as I understand it, celery bitters pretty much disappeared between sometime in the middle of prohibition and, believe it or not, 2008.)

I’ve also noticed there’s something of a fetish among bartenders not to end up with bits of mint in the final, strained drink. It happened to me a lot of the time, and it wasn’t a problem  either in terms of taste or aesthetics, in my view.

And just a reminder that you will really need a good, solid muddler suitable for lemon smashing as described so long ago in our guide to bar implements. If you don’t have one, you can improvise but you want something solid. A freshly washed hammer used with extreme caution, perhaps.

 

  

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