2014 Father’s Day Gift Guide: Entertainment

Everyone loves watching a great movie or TV series, so we’ve compiled some of our favorite releases from the past year that just about guy will enjoy. And for more gift ideas, be sure to check out the other categories in our Father’s Day gift guide.

The Wolf of Wall Street

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It’s been a while since Martin Scorsese’s last truly great film, but the director has rebounded in style with “The Wolf of Wall Street,” highlighted by Terrence Winter’s hilarious script and Leonard DiCaprio’s brilliant turn as Jordan Belfort. You’ve never seen the actor quite like this before, and he’s in top form as the notorious stockbroker, delivering what is arguably his best performance with Scorsese yet. The rest of the cast is great as well, especially Jonah Hill in another award-worthy turn, up-and-comer Margot Robbie and Matthew McConaughey in a short but memorable cameo. Loud, flashy and totally obscene, the movie is like a private tour through Belfort’s excessive, hard-partying lifestyle, including easily one of the greatest sequences of the year. (Hint: it involves a highly potent strain of Quaaludes.) Though it’s a little too long for its own good, the characters are so magnetic and the dialogue so fast and funny that “The Wolf of Wall Street” is hard not to enjoy. It’s Scorsese’s best film in years, and one that will only get better with time.

Gravity

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It’s been six years since Alfonso Cuarón’s last feature film – the criminally underrated “Children of Men” – but his outer space survival thriller was well worth the wait. “Gravity” is the kind of movie that will likely change the way films are made in the future. From the stunning, single-take opening sequence that lasts more than 12 minutes, to the numerous set pieces throughout, “Gravity” is such a technical marvel that it looks like Cuarón shot the whole damn thing in space. Though the story is ridiculously simple, not a single second of its 91-minute runtime is wasted, extracting so much suspense from the film’s terrifying setup that the brief injections of comedy (courtesy of George Clooney’s easygoing astronaut) are a welcome reprieve from the almost unrelenting intensity. Sandra Bullock delivers one of the best performances of her career as the rookie astronaut caught up in a seemingly impossible situation, but the real star of “Gravity” is Cuarón himself, and he deserves every bit of praise for creating what can only be described as pure movie magic.

Game of Thrones: The Complete Third Season

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Creators David Benioff and D.B Weiss have stated numerous times that they set Season Three as the unofficial benchmark as to whether or not the show would be a success, and it’s easy to see why, because it showcases the full complexity and richness of the universe that they inherited from George R.R. Martin. The third season expands its scope even further than the previous year, with several new characters quickly making their mark, and old ones (like Nikolaj Coster-Waldau’s Jamie Lannister, one of the season’s MVPs) continuing to evolve within that moral gray area where “Game of Thrones” thrives. It also featured some of the most shocking story developments to date, perhaps none more so than Episode 9’s infamous Red Wedding, which made Ned Stark’s beheading look like child’s play in comparison and was without a doubt one of the biggest television events of last year. The audience reaction to that episode is very telling of the show’s pop cultural footprint, and when the writing and acting is this good, it’s no surprise why its popularity continues to grow.

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24 Blog 9.6: There is a light that never goes out

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”And if a double-decker bus crashes into us…”

It’s as if the writers of “24” have been reading this blog, and secretly sent me a love letter.

What, the Smiths reference isn’t enough proof? Fine, I’ll go one better. Jack is trying to trick weasel arms dealer Karl Rask into uploading tracking software to his computer – meanwhile, in the next room, Kate is getting the shit kicked out of her as a decoy, because what Federal agent wouldn’t sign up for that? – and Rask tells Jack that he knows the people at the bank where he set up the account, and asks him about Metzger (that’s the German spelling of my name. It means ‘butcher,’ if you’re curious). The move is clearly a bluff, and Jack sniffs it out. Still, both Rask and Jack are repeatedly talking about Metzger. “Describe Metzger to me!” “There is no Metzger at the bank.”

In the end, I apparently don’t exist. Damn. Still, for a few moments, this episode was all about me, and that felt pretty damn good.

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Why Khan and Mayweather needs to happen

Many in the boxing world felt slightly cheated when Floyd Mayweather announced that he would face Argentinian Marcos Maidana on May 3rd, rather than Amir Khan. The undisputed pound-for-pound king had stated that he would let the fans decide whom he would fight, but despite Khan coming out in the poll, “Money” opted to face Maidana.

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Movie Review: “300: Rise of an Empire”

Starring
Sullivan Stapleton, Eva Green, Rodrigo Santoro, Lena Headey, Jack O’Connell
Director
Noam Murro

There is only one woman who doesn’t end up raped or murdered. The ones who are spared rape – presumably, anyway; for all we know, they were raped before we witness their deaths – are nearly all slaughtered while topless. Far be it from me to sound like a feminist, but there are parts of “300: Rise of an Empire” that are disturbing on a number of levels. Zack Snyder, who opted not to direct the follow-up to his 2006 smash “300” but co-wrote the screenplay, will likely argue that these were dark days, and heinous crimes were committed, and we will not debate either point. However, when all of the naked victims are ‘D’ cups, it sends a mixed message, to say the least.

The story takes place at the same time as “300” (give or take a few days) and takes a boatload of exposition to explain, as Athenian warrior Themistocles (Sullivan Stapleton) leads a small but tough group of men to battle against the invading Persian army. Much like his brother in arms King Leonidas, Themistocles and his battalion stun the Persians, and Themistocles even manages to kill Persian King Darius, who arrogantly attended the attack thinking he was untouchable. Unfortunately for Greece, Darius’ death opens the door for Darius’ ruthless naval commander Artemisia (Eva Green) to persuade heir to the throne Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro) to resist his father’s death-bed plea for peace and to instead bury Greece. Why is Artemisia so bent on Greece’s destruction? She is Greek herself, and is seeking revenge for the injustices done to her and her family by Greek forces when she was a girl.

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Australia’s Hardys is Killing It at Every Price Point!

Hardys is one of the largest wine brands in the world. They’re so big, in fact, that each day more than two million glasses of Hardys wines are consumed worldwide. It’s no surprise, as they make a lot of wine from a variety of grapes in a broad array of styles, all sold at prices to accommodate just about any budget. I recently had the opportunity to taste a cross-section of their portfolio alongside their chief winemaker Paul Lapsley. He manages a team of 27 winemakers across their vast array of brands. Here’s a look at three of my favorite wines from the evening that, quite frankly, I think everyone should be drinking.

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The Hardys 2012 William Hardy Chardonnay was produced from fruit sourced in several different Australian regions; the bulk however comes from Padthaway (57.2 percent) and Riverland (30.1 percent). The fruit was picked at night under cooler conditions to help maximize freshness. Fermentation took place in oak, and the finished produce was aged in stainless steel with some additional oak treatment. This offering is 100 percent Chardonnay. This wine has a suggested retail price of $17. Aromas of pineapple fill the ebullient nose of this Chardonnay. Hints of crème fraiche appear on the palate where they balance juicy peach and orchard fruit flavors. Hints of citrus lead the lengthy finish, along with baker’s spice. This wine has a crisp, clean ending that begs you back to the glass for sip after sip. This is a Chardonnay that has a bit of appealing added oak complexity. However, those notes never overshadow the glorious fruit that shines through. This is a really delicious and appealing Chardonnay.

The Hardys 2012 Nottage Hill Pinot Noir was produced from fruit sourced in South Eastern Australia. The Nottage Hill wines have been part of the overall Hardys line since 1967. This is a wine that is widely available across the country and has a suggested retail price of $13; if you shop around you’re likely to find it for a couple of bucks less. The light red hue of this wine is exceptionally pretty in the glass. Red fruit aromas abound on the nose. Strawberry flavors dominate the palate and they’re underscored by bits of red cherry; a dollop of vanilla bean is present. Black tea, mushrooms and earth are all in abundance on the finish, which has above average length for the category. This wine will pair well will an extraordinarily wide array of foods. It’s hard to find good Pinot in this price range. This one is simply a knockout for the price.

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The Tintara McLaren Vale 2010 Shiraz was produced entirely from fruit sourced in the namesake region. Dating back to 1861, Tintara is one of Hardys’ oldest brands. The winery itself is located within McLaren Vale. This offering is 100 percent Shiraz. Different parcels of fruit were harvested, vinified and aged separately. Aging took place over 14 months in oak barriques. The separate lots were blended prior to bottling. This Shiraz, which is widely available, has a suggested retail price of $19; however it often sells for close to $15. Compote of dark fruit aromas fills the nose of this wine. Similar characteristics pick up on the palate where blackberry, raspberry and plum pudding spice rules the day. This is a hefty wine that is layered with layers of flavor. Coffee and chocolate characteristics lead the finish, which is long and lingering. This is a lovely example of Shiraz that is full bodied but not over the top. It’s a proportionate wine that works well on its own but excels when paired with substantial foods.

This group of wines from the overall Hardys umbrella shows off a wide swatch of what is possible in Australia. First, they are each proportionate, varietally correct offerings that will all pair nicely with appropriate food groupings. From a value standpoint they are each fairly priced and provide more than solid quality in their respective categories. The Pinot Noir however sets itself apart. More than being a good value, it’s an absolutely outstanding one. It’s quite simply one of the very best Pinot Noirs in the ever popular $10 to $15 price bracket. There are tons of Pinot selections in this category; nevertheless precious few of them can match the quality of the Hardys Nottage Hill Pinot Noir. If you’re looking to buy a case or two as a house wine to keep on hand for everyday drinking, this Pinot is an absolutely perfect choice. At $13 or less a bottle you’re practically stealing it. Hardys has a host of other wines besides this trio. They are proportionate wines that are true to their varietal. Don’t hesitate to buy anything with their name on it, for it’s a sign of quality and value.

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