R.I.P. Bill Nunn

Actor Bill Nunn passed away according to director Spike Lee. Nunn is probably best known for his iconic role as Radio Raheem in Spike Lee’s 1991 classic “Do The Right Thing.” Nunn was an excellent actor and had a long career in film, and we remember his role in “Regarding Henry” very well. He played Bradley, the physical therapist who helped Harrison Ford’s character recover and rebuild his life following a gunshot wound. It’s an underrated film that’s worth watching, and Nunn’s understated performance stood out even with great performances by Ford and Annette Bening.

Rest in peace…

  

You can follow us on Twitter and Facebook for content updates. Also, sign up for our email list for weekly updates and check us out on Google+ as well.

“Jason Bourne” delivers at box office

Why do we get so many action sequels? You can argue laziness, or also the general interest of fans. Matt Damon said people constantly were asking him when Jason Bourne would return. But the real reason has to do with money and profits. The new Bourne film is closing in on $400 million overall gross, with around $160 million domestic. Those are pretty strong numbers for just creating a new installment in a series.

Read the rest of this entry »

  

What to Invest in to Save Money as a College Student

wallet-1013789_640

For many students, college is an expensive few years of their life. Along with the ever-rising cost of tuition fess, which are currently at an all-time high, students also have to worry about a whole range of other costs, such as the cost of living – rent, food and transportation – not to mention the money spent on study aids such as a new laptop or tablet, textbooks and even accessories such as stationery. Since most students are only able to earn a small wage by working part-time, it’s no surprise that finances can get tight quickly when you’re studying for a degree. We’ve put together some of the best ways to invest your money as a student to ensure that you’re saving as much as possible.

Read the rest of this entry »

  

Drink of the Week: The Improved Cocktail (Take 2)

Image ALT text goes here.So, as we learned last week, once upon a time, the term “cocktail” was not today’s generic term for any mixed alcoholic beverage but instead was a drink that called for a base spirit, bitters, sugar/simple syrup and maybe a bit of additional water and a fruit garnish of some sort. Thus, the original cocktail — which was not, obviously, called the Old Fashioned yet, as it was actually still kind of a newfangled thing — begat the Improved Cocktail, which adds a small amount of a liqueur to the mix and which, unlike the Old Fashioned today, is primarily served up (i.e. with the ice strained out).

While punches and numerous other mixed drinks definitely predated this Gilded Age classic, today’s drink is definitely something of an ur-cocktail in that it presumably helped open the door for the cornucopia of strong boozy beverages that are now the backbone of pretty much any home or professional bartender’s repertoire.

Last week’s Improved Cocktail recipe, however, was built around genever (the ur-gin from the Netherlands), and while that recipe can work very nicely with base spirits that are now more common, I’m not sure it’s the absolute best way to go when you’re dealing with whiskey or brandy. This week’s recipe is purloined/adapted from several different online sources which, in turn, were borrowed from the original recipe from ur-bartender Jerry Thomas. Compared to my genever recipe, it adds literally just a dash of one more ingredient and cuts the liqueur proportion in half, which may work better with base spirits that are somewhat more sweet.

Read the rest of this entry »

  

Movie Review: “The Magnificent Seven”

Starring
Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt, Ethan Hawke, Byung-hun Lee, Hayley Bennett, Peter Sarsgaard, Vincent D’Onofrio
Director
Antoine Fuqua

Hollywood remakes are hardly a new concept, but while there have been a handful of movies that actually improved upon the original, most tend not to be as good, either because they veer too far from what made them enjoyable or not far enough to make it worthwhile. Antoine Fuqua’s “The Magnificent Seven” is an interesting case in that it’s technically a remake of a remake, based on the 1960 John Sturges film of the same name, which was itself inspired by Akira Kurosawa’s “Seven Samurai.” Although it certainly had the odds stacked against it, the movie succeeds where so many have failed by retaining the spirit of its predecessors while also distinguishing itself just enough to stand on its own. It’s not exactly magnificent, but it’s a slick and entertaining take on a familiar tale that’s bursting with personality.

The year is 1879, and the small town of Rose Creek has been invaded by an evil mining baron named Bartholomew Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard), who presents the townspeople with an ultimatum: accept his paltry offer to buy their land or stay and suffer the consequences when he returns in three weeks. And to prove that he means business, Bogue murders the outspoken husband of Emma Cullen (Hayley Bennett). While her neighbors cower inside their homes, Emma goes searching for help in a nearby town and hires bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Denzel Washington), who in turn recruits six other men – drunken gambler Josh Farraday (Chris Pratt), former Confederate sharpshooter Goodnight Robicheaux (Ethan Hawke), knives expert Billy Rocks (Byung-hun Lee), fur trapper Jack Horne (Vincent D’Onofrio), Mexican outlaw Vasquez (Manuel Garcia-Rulfo) and Comanche warrior Red Harvest (Martin Sensmeier) – to protect the town and put an end to Bogue’s tyranny. But as they prepare for the inevitable attack, the seven mercenaries soon realize that they’re fighting for more than money.

Read the rest of this entry »