Blu Tuesday: Jane Got a Gun, Ride Along 2 and Krampus

Every Tuesday, I review the newest Blu-ray releases and let you know whether they’re worth buying, renting or skipping, along with a breakdown of the included extras. If you see something you like, click on the cover art to purchase the Blu-ray from Amazon, and be sure to share each week’s column on Facebook and Twitter with your friends.

“Jane Got a Gun”

WHAT: When her outlaw husband (Noah Emmerich) returns home riddled with bullets after an altercation with the dastardly John Bishop (Ewan McGregor), Jane (Natalie Portman) recruits her bitter ex-lover (Joel Edgerton) to help protect them once John’s gang comes to finish the job.

WHY: “Jane Got a Gun” had such a rocky road to the big screen – including shakeups in the cast and crew, lawsuits and distribution problems – that it’s a miracle the film survived to see the light of day, let alone turned out as good as it did. Though the movie is a bit of a slow burn, the recurring use of flashbacks helps to break up the tediousness of the present-day action while also providing important backstory for its three lead characters. “Jane Got a Gun” isn’t quite the female empowerment Western that its title suggests, but it’s still a pretty decent genre flick that’s anchored by a top-notch cast. While Ewan McGregor is sadly wasted in the generic villain role, Joel Edgerton and Natalie Portman deliver solid work as the former lovers brought back together under difficult circumstances. Director Gavin O’Connor’s stripped-down approach gives the performances room to breathe, and it’s during these quieter moments, when he’s able to explore the emotional complexities of the central love triangle, that the movie really shines.

EXTRAS: Nothing to see here folks.

FINAL VERDICT: RENT

Read the rest of this entry »

  

You can follow us on Twitter and Facebook for content updates. Also, sign up for our email list for weekly updates and check us out on Google+ as well.

Get Transported to Las Vegas Whenever You Want

casino-1249899_640

Las Vegas is the largest city in Nevada, and it is surrounded by magnificent hills. This fantasy city is all about glitz and glitter, which often overshadows its amazing landscape. While the Las Vegas Strip is definitely a must-see sight, the state of Nevada has some incredible natural diversity, where you may can indulge in plenty of outdoor activities such as mountain biking, hiking, horseback riding, fishing and even skiing.

Read the rest of this entry »

  

Ironstone Vineyards: A tale of two California regions

Ironstone Vineyards is a family owned and operated winery in California. Their winery facility is located in the Sierra Foothills. They grow grapes there and in the Lodi region. In total, they have more than 8,000 acres planted in a multitude of crops, with more than 4,000 under vine. Their wide-ranging portfolio offers a taste of both varieties that immediately spring to mind when you think of the region: Petite Sirah, as well as less obvious ones like Cabernet Franc. Prices start at $12 and range up to $75. I recently tasted through quite a few of their current releases with a member of the Kautz family while I was attending ProWein in Düsseldorf, Germany. In short, there is a ton to like there. Their wines are fairly priced, delicious and show genuine characteristics of the varieties in question, as well as a sense of the place they were each grown. Here’s a look at my favorites from that tasting.

ironstone_1

Ironstone Vineyards 2014 Chenin Blanc ($12)

Ironstone’s Chenin Blanc is composed entirely of the namesake grape. All of the fruit came from the Lodi region. Orchard fruit and white flower aromas light up the welcoming nose. The moment you take a sip, the super-soft mouth-feel envelops your senses. Lots of gentle pear, apricot and lychee fruit flavors are present. White pepper and a hint of nutmeg are on the mellifluous finish. This wine is perfectly suited to pair with light foods, but it’s also remarkably delicious on its own. This is spring and/or summer in a glass.

Ironstone Vineyards 2013 Reserve Viognier ($18)

This wine is composed mostly of Viognier (90 percent) with a dollop of Chardonnay (10 percent) blended in. It was produced from Estate fruit grown on their Sierra Foothills property. Yellow peach and apricot aromas fill the welcoming nose here. The palate is loaded with stone fruit flavors, spices and hints of papaya. Hints of crème fraiche are at play alongside continued yellow fruits and hints of spice on the long, balanced finish. Some Viogniers are too forward, too fruity and almost sweet. This particular example is remarkably balanced and delicious; it’s also impressive for its price point.

Read the rest of this entry »

  

5 Questions with Old Spice Guy Isaiah Mustafa

Old Spice Guy Isaiah Mustafa helped Old Spice kick off its partnership with Tough Mudder as the official Men’s Body Wash and Anti-Perspirant/Deodorant of the rigorous obstacle course series on Saturday, Apr. 16, 2016 in San Bernardino, Calif., offering the perfect proving ground for guys to test the legendary performance of the new Old Spice Hardest Working Collection. (Photos Gilles Mingasson / AP for Old Spice)

Old Spice Guy Isaiah Mustafa is more than a pretty face with a a tightly toned torso and a voice like butter. At one point, he was a actually a real dude, just like you.

After running track in high school, Mustafa decided to try football and ultimately walked-on at Arizona State University as a wide receiver. He played in the 1997 Rose Bowl and caught passes from quarterback Jake “The Snake” Plummer.

Post graduation in 1997, Mustafa played on the practice squads for the Tennessee Oilers, Oakland Raiders, Cleveland Browns, Seattle Seahawks and even played a season in NFL Europe for the Barcelona Dragons.

After football and prior to landing the “Old Spice Guy” gig, Mustafa owned and operated a restaurant in L.A., won $47,000 on game show The Weakest Link and landed acting roles for shows on NBC, ABC, USA Network and The CW.

We spoke to Isaiah just prior to the kickoff of Old Spice’s year-long partnership with Tough Mudder at Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, where he and thousands of athletes took on a grueling 10-plus mile obstacle course.

Read the rest of this entry »

  

Drink of the Week: The Chocolate Flip

the Chocolate Flip.The Chocolate Flip doesn’t contain the slightest hint of anything remotely chocolate. No, in the manner of its very close relative, the Coffee Cocktail, the Chocolate Flip blends brandy and a whole egg with more sugary/fruity ingredients to create a more sweet than bitter flavor and a light tan color. If you’re determined to think it tastes slightly like chocolate, then I guess it does.. It’s really just another of the countless variations on the Flip formula, but an interesting enough combo that I think it deserves it’s own post.

The Chocolate Flip comes directly from David Embury’s “The Fine Art of Mixing Cocktails,” though it’s  only referred to in passing. Mr. Embury’s preference was towards somewhat dry drinks, which he believed were ideal for stimulating the appetite before a meal, and this is actually a nearly ideal dessert or, if you dare, breakfast beverage.

Chocolate-free though it is, the Chocolate Flip, even in this version, is fattening enough that making this drink over the course of a week has probably accounted for at least an additional pound or two on yours truly thanks to adding seven eggs to my weekly diet. To be fair, however, my appetite has never required much stimulating.

The Chocolate Flip

1 ounce brandy
1 ounce sloe gin
1 to 1 1/2 teaspoon superfine sugar or simple syrup
Sprinkling of nutmeg (borderline mandatory garnish)

I have done so many of these egg-based drinks, I could probably just cut and paste this part, but I like you guys, so I’ll write this for you fresh. Combine all the ingredients in a cocktail shaker without ice for the so-called dry shake. Shake the contents fairly vigorously, but be careful to watch out for the interesting phenomenon that happens when you shake whole eggs or egg white; the top of your shaker may want to pop off and make a mess. Next, add ice and shake more vigorously for about 15 seconds or so. Strain into a chilled glass. (Cocktail glasses and old fashioned glasses are both good.)

Read the rest of this entry »