A chat with UFC fighter Dan Hardy: Part Two

In the first part of our interview with Dan Hardy, the UFC fighter discussed his feelings toward allowing cardiologists to put wires into his heart to determine the extent of his Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome in order to be cleared to fight. In Part Two, Dan discusses fighter pay, his sponsor’s reaction to his heart condition, his WolfCam training videos, his views on Carlos Condit, the mental edge of athletics and passing on learned lessons.

Mike Furci: Well, as much as I would love to see you fight like many other MMA fans, I have to agree with your decision. What has your sponsor’s reaction been to this situation?

Dan Hardy: You know what? I really can’t thank my sponsor enough. I really expected it to cause all kinds of problems and it’s really not. Venomfight and Xyience are just behind me all the way. They’re still selling my shirts, my shorts and Xyience is still promoting me. It’s refreshing because it’s given me a little bit of time to really get this figured out without having to worry about getting to a fight to pay bills.

It really means a lot. You know, obviously in a situation like this, it would be quite easy to turn their back and move onto the next fighter, but that’s not been the case. I don’t just feel like a commodity now; I truly feel like part of the team.

MF: That’s a hell of a tribute and says a lot about those two corporations – Venum and Xyience. So what’s this I hear you’re claiming to be in the best shape of your life? What’s different about your training now and what are some of the reasons you believe you’re in such great shape?

Dan: Well, this situation with the Wolf-Parkinson-White kind of lit a fire in my ass and my solution to being disallowed to fight is to prove that I’m able to fight by physically just being far better than I have before. I’m not getting beat up as much, I’m not doing the sparing and that type of stuff, so I’m able to train for much longer and I’m doing a lot of yoga. The thing is, the studio is so hot – I mean it’s a 90-minute session and I lose about eight pounds a session. I’m really working on my flexibility. Just basically all-around fitness and flexibility is what I’m going for. It’s kind of funny that my career is potentially coming to an end and I’m actually just finding my stride in my training camp. Totally ironic.

MF: Speaking of training, can you talk a little bit about the WolfCam and your series of training videos that you’ve got YouTube?

Dan: Yeah. Well, I was getting a lot of questions about training, and so the best way for me to answer these questions was just to make a video available. My intention is just to kind of show people what I am doing. Really, I’m not trying to educate anybody or say, “You should be doing this.” You know, if I can make this information available, then hopefully someone will benefit from it. And the feedback from people who are doing my training sessions has been very positive.

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A chat with UFC fighter Dan Hardy: Part One

Dan “The Outlaw” Hardy, who started martial arts as a kid, began training for competitive fighting in 2002 after 14 years of traditional marital arts. He joined the UFC in 2008 and made his debut at UFC 89, winning by split decision.

Dan hardy is a very hard working, outspoken person that personifies a great attitude. In part one of this interview, I had the opportunity to talk to Dan about his artistry, his experience training with the Shaolin monks, the GSP fight, the possibility of losing his contract with the UFC, being diagnosed with a heart condition WPW and the reaction by Dana White.

Mike Furci: First, I’d like to thank you for taking the time today to talk with me Dan.

Dan Hardy: No worries Mike, no worries.

MF: Fans of Bullz-Eye and MMA, today we’re talking with Dan Hardy, one of the most recognizable MMA fighters of today, a UFC welterweight crowd pleasure who fought Georges St-Pierre for the title in 2010. In that fight, he escaped two submission attempts that would have easily forced the vast majority of fighters to tap out, which I believe, Dan, is not only a testament to you, the fighter, but also Dan Hardy the person – as the audience will see as we proceed through this interview. And though you’re not currently fighting, you definitely have not been sidelined.

And before we get into what you’ve been doing recently, I’d like to take the Bullz-Eye readership back somewhat to get to know you a little better and discuss your career as a fighter, if you don’t mind.

DH: Sure.

MF: One thing I didn’t know myself as much as I follow MMA is that you’re an artist.

DH: Yeah, that always comes as a surprise to people.

MF: As most artists, I’m sure you discovered your talents when you were very young, and I understand you were also doing MMA at a very young age. What pulled you into the direction of MMA as a career?

DH: Really, just the drive at the time. I mean, I’ve always been an artist. As a kid, I always had a sketchbook in my hand, so even my parents thought I was going to follow that path. But when I was at university studying art, it occurred to me that this was my athletic peak and I needed to explore it right now. I could always return to art in the future.

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