A chat with Jay Glazer, Fox NFL Insider for Captain Morgan

Jay Glazer spoke with Paul Eide of Bullz-Eye.com.

Fox NFL Insider Jay Glazer is the man you go to for information. He’s cornered the market on both the NFL and MMA and is the ultimate “information broker” in a sea of imitators.

Here’s a piece of info that Glazer hipped me to: This Friday, September 19th is “International Talk Like a Pirate Day” sponsored by Captain Morgan. Just use the hashtags #CaptainandColaaarr and #TLAPD on social media and Captain Morgan will donate $1 to charity.

We spoke with Jay about working with Captain Morgan, what it was like for him to break into TV as an NFL Insider, and how he broke the New England Patriots “Spygate” scandal.

Does your phone ever stop ringing? Or is there always some dude from some website like me at the other end? 

“No, it’s not just dudes from websites — it’s usually a coach or a player. With all the off-the-field stuff, Ray Rice, Adrian Peterson… this week has been the most difficult week of my career. I signed up to cover football, not be a social commentator. But luckily, Captain Morgan came along at the perfect time to do a really fun campaign. This Friday is International Talk Like a Pirate Day. In honor of that, for everybody who uses the hashtags #CaptainandColaaarr and #TLAPD on social media, Captain Morgan will donate $1 to charity. And if there’s any on-air talent who participates, Captain Morgan will donate $1,000.

I have a charity for military veterans called Purple Hearts Homes that we are donating to. It’s a fun campaign. They came to me and I loved it. Anything to step away from all the other garbage that is going on and let’s have something fun. Sports is escapism – nothing else. We’re there to give you a break from the real world, a break from this kind of stuff. Now sports, your normal escape, is more serious than the thing you’re trying to escape from! I decided yesterday, no more serious stuff.”

Read the rest of this entry »

  

You can follow us on Twitter and Facebook for content updates. Also, sign up for our email list for weekly updates and check us out on Google+ as well.

Drink of the Week: The Blinker (Duffy’s Version)

the Blinker.The Blinker was one of the many moribund beverages revived by Ted Haigh in his epochal 2009 book, Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails. Haigh, in turn, found the drink in a 1934 tome by a Patrick Gavin Duffy but found it “unremarkable” and he therefore messed with it. We’ll try Haigh’s messed with version later, but we start with the unvarnished original.

The Duffy Blinker might not have knocked my socks clean off, but it really is a very nice drink enlivened by a generous portion of fresh grapefruit juice. I have to admit that the fact that I still had some extra-large citrus around after last week’s drink was my primary motivator for choosing the Blinker. I never used to like anything grapefruit but, by god, the bittersweet fruit is really growing on me. It’s certainly tasty enough in this beverage.

The Blinker (Duffy’s Version)

2 ounces bourbon
1 ounce grapefruit juice (preferably fresh)
1 teaspoon grenadine
1 lemon twist (desirable garnish)

No surprises here. You guys probably have this drill memorized by now, but here it is again…

Combine your liquids in a cocktail shaker with an excess of ice. Shake most vigorously, and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Add your lemon twist if you’ve got one handy. As for the toast, let’s mix things up and salute, heck, Ethel Barrymore. I just saw her for the first time in 1948′s “Portrait of Jennie” (ask your neighborhood movie geek/film buff, or your great-grandmother) and she was extremely good in it. As a Barrymore, I’d like to think she might have tried a Blinker.

******

This drink worked very nicely with the two different bourbons I had time to try before I was briefly sidelined by a small cold. (As I write this, I’ve been dry for a shocking four days!) Wathen’s Kentucky Bourbon made a fine, sweet base spirit, but there was more 100 proof, bottled in bond, punch when I killed my bottle of good ol’ Old Fitzgerald’s (my favorite bourbon bargain up to now).

I will also add that I suspect it’s probably very important to use a decent grenadine in the Blinker. Ted Haigh, you see, felt the need to make a substitution for this ingredient. He might have been partly moved by the fact that so many commercially available grenadines are hard to distinguish from any other high fructose corn syrup based concoctions.

At the same time, while it’s great to spend extra dough and go gourmet, or go crazy and make your own grenadine, as some bloggers insist, there is another option. Take a little time and find a reasonably priced product that includes a little real juice, pomegranate most importantly. Master of Mixes grenadine includes pomegranite and cherry juice; it has served me well for some time and it only costs a few bucks…and, no, they haven’t been sending me free bottles in the mail. Not yet, anyway.

  

Drink of the Week: The Ideal Cocktail

Image ALT text goes here.A long time ago, a boss of mine was discussing an upcoming project and said something to the effect that “in an ideal world, we’d complete this task in two or three days.” I said, something like, “No, in an ideal world we wouldn’t have to work at all; we’d be romping with bunnies wearing nothing but flowers and praising the Lord.”

In other words, of course, the ideal cocktail doesn’t exist. Thanks to the miracle of proper names, however, the Ideal Cocktail does exist. It’s not ideal but it’s definitely not bad. It did, though, require a bit of futzing with the proportions based on the somewhat vague instructions in the most reliable source for this early 20th century tipple, The Savoy Cocktail Book. I’m very okay with the rather stiff beverage I came up with based on Harry Craddock’s prohibition-era recipe, with just a little bit of bloggy help.

The Ideal Cocktail

2 ounces London dry gin
1 ounce sweet vermouth
1 tablespoon fresh grapefruit juice
1 teaspoon maraschino liqueur
1 grapefruit twist (desirable garnish)

Combine the gin, vermouth, juice, and bittersweet cherry liqueur in a cocktail shaker and shake. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Toast the reality that, in all likelihood, there’ll never be an ideal anything. After all, if we all knew how to make the perfect cocktail, cook the perfect steak, make the perfect movie, or find the perfect love, life would either get really dull, or we’d all explode or something.

***

Harry Craddock’s recipe is a bit vague by modern standards as it calls for 1 part vermouth to two parts gin, but specifically tells us to add a tablespoon of grapefruit juice regardless of how big our “parts” are. It also calls for an incredibly frustrating three dashes of maraschino, which can be anything.

When first trying this drink out, I took my cue from Erik Ellestad’s 2009 post on his Savoy Stomp blog. He interpreted 3 dashes of maraschino to equal a teaspoon of the bittersweet cherry liqueur. He also — reasonably enough — called for 1 1/2 ounces of gin and 3/4 ounce of sweet vermouth, with him using the pricey (and admittedly fantastic) Carpano Antica. I liked his orthodox take on the drink which differs from the very few other versions of this you’ll find online.

I chose my fall-back sweet vermouth, Noilly Pratt and started with Mr. Ellestad’s proportions, using a bottle of Tanqueray I’ve been itching to work with. I dismissed his suggestion to stir, not shake, the drink out of hand, however. Though I tend to be generally highly skeptical of the booze snob ban on stirring many cocktails for fear or spoiling the beauty and booziness of the drink, in this case most c-snobs actually have my back; conventional wisdom supports shaking any drink with citrus juice in it. I think it’s a necessity here.

In fact, even vigorously shaken, the Ideal Cocktail came out a bit cloying to my tastebuds at those proportions. After experimenting with both Maraska and Luxardo brands maraschino, I decided that, this time, Luxardo was definitely the better choice, justifying it’s higher price tag. More importantly, I finally settled on upping the amounts of the Tanqueray and Noilly Pratt I was using. The results were bracing and just sweet enough, though I admit that it’s a pretty stiff drink.

In an effort to make it a hair less stiff, I switched from the 94.6 proof Tanqueray  to value price, 80 proof, Gordon’s. Not bad, if less than ideal.

 

 

  

The Selvarey Chicago Fizz

Selvarey Chicago Fizz. Today’s drink is the most deliciously nutritious and possibly (though not definitely) the last of the cocktails we’ll be featuring here with a base booze provided by the skilled distillers of Selvarey White Rum. If you missed my earlier experiments with this brand, all I can say is that it’s a genuine Panamanian treat from a company which also boasts darn good taste in cocktails.

The Selvarey Chicago Fizz differs from most of the other Chicago Fizz recipes you’ll find online in that’s it’s made with Selvarey White Rum, instead of a sweeter dark rum. The result is a beverage that’s almost perfectly balanced between sweet and tart flavors. I’m not sure about actually curing a hangover, but if you’re determined to have a cocktail in the morning, which means you’re either drinking too much, on vacation, or both, this may be the most outstanding choice possible.

The Selvarey Chicago Fizz

1 ounce Selvarey White Rum
1 ounce tawny port wine
3/4 ounce lemon juice
1 raw egg white or 1 ounce of pasteurized egg white
1/2 ounce simple syrup or 2 1/2 teaspoons superfine sugar
Soda water

Combine all the ingredients except the soda water in a cocktail shaker, without ice. “Dry shake” without the ice to emulsify the egg. Then shake again, very vigorously and now with plenty of ice. Strain into a chilled Tom Collins-style glass. Top off with that soda water (preferably chilled) you’ve been holding back and you’ll find yourself with a nice “head” on your fizz. Sipp and salute the concept of carbonated water, without which life would be just a little bit more flat.

*****

I usually talk about ingredients in this section, but this time I’ll offer a note about your bartending equipment first. You’ll likely have better results with your Chicago Fizz if you use an old fashioned separate cocktail strainer like the pro bartenders use, rather than the built in kind. The pre-fizz portion of the drink is thick enough that’s it’s tricky to get out of those tiny holes at the top of the shaker. Regular readers will remember that I’ve made many drinks with egg whites, but this seemed to be more of an issue this week than with other egg white cocktails — either that, or I’m just losing my patience.

Fizzes are an entire mixed drink category I’ve barely touched on. What’s interesting is that the inclusion of relatively small amount of soda water renders a pretty massive change, and I don’t just mean bubbles.

A cocktail featuring an egg white usually has a lovely, soft and milky texture. Adding the fizzy water, however, causes the egg white to separate from the rest of the drink, which produces a head which is similar to what you might find in root beer or, even more to the point, that non-alcoholic New York/Jewish deli favorite, an egg cream. (If you know your deli beverages, you’re aware that an egg cream  contains chocolate syrup but no egg and no cream, but it has a very nice foamy head owing to the presence of milk and seltzer.)

In the case of the Selvarey Chicago Fizz, or the Jacques Straub 1914 take on the Chicago Fizz to the boozy historians, the result is fruity, not too sweet and — relatively speaking — not too heavy on the booze. In fact, it’s so not too sweet that I wouldn’t blame you if you amped up the amount of simple syrup or sugar.

Finally, it is definitely permissible to try this with other brands of white rum. I gave it a shot with a far older premium brand and, while I preferred the lighter, sweeter touch of the Selvarey, it wasn’t bad with Brand X. In any case, using a rum to your liking, not to mention a good tawny port (not my particular area of expertise; I used a brand called Almiro), will likely yield a better drink. Follow your instincts.

  

Quantity versus Quality: Solving the Protein Puzzle

shutterstock_90081781

Protein, essential for life and good health, is somewhat of a puzzle to those who want to understand how to stay healthy and maintain a good weight. We know protein is essential, but many don’t know too much information beyond that.
Is there a limit to how much we should ingest? Should we depend on alternative sources like vitamins and powders for added protein? Is it unhealthy to opt for a vegetarian or vegan diet?

How Much Protein Should We Eat?

American doctors suggest a minimum of 8 grams of protein per 20 pounds of body weight. The Institute of Medicine suggests that protein account for 10% to 35% of caloric intake. Aside from medicinal recommendations, there’s little evidence of a ‘magic number.’ In America, recommended daily intake is 46 grams for adult women and 56 grams for men. But, why do we need protein at all?

Read the rest of this entry »

  

Related Posts